Change view: Change style to mobile Change style to narrow Change style to default

Recipe by Daniel Myers

Menagier de Paris calls this recipe "CHERVIS", which from context is evidently a kind of root vegetable. Cotgrave's Dictionarie of the French and English Tongues defines chervis as being either a skirret or a parsnip.

10 parsnips (approx.)
1/4 cup figs, finely chopped
1/4 cup raisins
1/2 tsp. fine spice powder

Peel parsnips and cut into long pieces, discarding any woody center parts. Place in boiling water and cook until just tender. Drain and place into a pie crust. Add figs, raisins, and sprinkle with spice powder. Cover with top crust and bake at 350°F until done. Serve cold.

[an error occurred while processing this directive] CHERVIS. The earliest appearing from the ground and freshly pulled, harvested in January, February, etc., are the best; and the freshest are known by the fact that they break off, and the old ones when pulled from the ground bend. You must clean them and remove the bad parts as with turnips, then you must wash them thoroughly in warm water, then parboil a little, then put them to dry on a towel, then flour them, then fry, then arrange nicely on little plates, and put sugar on them.

Item, if you wish to make pies with them, you must prepare them as above up to the frying, and then put them in pastry, breaking the longest in two pieces, and instead of the sugar mentioned above, you should put in figs chopped small and grapes.

Published: December 28, 2005